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Florida Legislature

  1. Half of Florida lawmakers fail or nearly fail review of support for public records

    State Roundup

    WEST PALM BEACH — Half of Florida's legislators failed or nearly failed in a review of their support for public records and meetings given by Florida newspapers and an open-government group after this year's legislative sessions.

    State Senator Bill Galvano, R- Bradenton (left) and Florida House Speaker Richard Corcoran ranked on opposite sides of the spectrum in an analysis of support for open records. Galvano scored a B-minus and Corcoran scored a D-plus.
[Times file photo]
  2. Legalized medical marijuana signed into law by Rick Scott

    State Roundup

    TALLAHASSEE — Gov. Rick Scott on Friday signed into law a broader medical marijuana system for the state, following through on a promise he made earlier this month.

    Gov. Rick Scott signed legislation on Friday that legalizes medical marijuana in Florida.
  3. Rick Scott signs medical marijuana, 37 other bills into law

    Blogs

    Gov. Rick Scott on Friday signed into law a broader medical marijuana system for the state, following through on a promise he made earlier this month.

    Gov. Rick Scott
  4. 'Garbage juice' seen as threat to drinking water in Florida Panhandle county

    Water

    To Waste Management, the nation's largest handler of garbage, the liquid that winds up at the bottom of a landfill is called "leachate," and it can safely be disposed of in a well that's 4,200 feet deep.

    Three samples that were displayed by Jackson County NAACP President Ronstance Pittman at a public meeting on Waste Management's deep well injection proposal. The sample on the left is full of leachate from the Jackson County landfill, the stuff that would be injected into the well. The sample on the right shows leachate after it's been treated at a wastewater treatment plant. The one in the middle is tap water.
  5. Rick Scott eyes Patronis as CFO, but it may not help him in Panhandle

    State Roundup

    TALLAHASSEE — Gov. Rick Scott's expected pick of Jimmy Patronis as the state's next chief financial officer would be a solid addition to the Republican Party ticket but may not do much to smooth some rough waters developing in the Panhandle over schools, area Republicans said this week.

    Former state Rep. Jimmy Patronis, left, is being considered by Gov. Rick Scott for the state’s chief financial officer. Patronis, seen with Scott in 2011, is considered one of the governor’s chief loyalists. (Associated Press)

  1. Half of Florida lawmakers fail or nearly fail review of support for public records

    State Roundup

    WEST PALM BEACH — Half of Florida's legislators failed or nearly failed in a review of their support for public records and meetings given by Florida newspapers and an open-government group after this year's legislative sessions.

    State Senator Bill Galvano, R- Bradenton (left) and Florida House Speaker Richard Corcoran ranked on opposite sides of the spectrum in an analysis of support for open records. Galvano scored a B-minus and Corcoran scored a D-plus.
[Times file photo]
  2. Legalized medical marijuana signed into law by Rick Scott

    State Roundup

    TALLAHASSEE — Gov. Rick Scott on Friday signed into law a broader medical marijuana system for the state, following through on a promise he made earlier this month.

    Gov. Rick Scott signed legislation on Friday that legalizes medical marijuana in Florida.
  3. Rick Scott signs medical marijuana, 37 other bills into law

    Blogs

    Gov. Rick Scott on Friday signed into law a broader medical marijuana system for the state, following through on a promise he made earlier this month.

    Gov. Rick Scott
  4. 'Garbage juice' seen as threat to drinking water in Florida Panhandle county

    Water

    To Waste Management, the nation's largest handler of garbage, the liquid that winds up at the bottom of a landfill is called "leachate," and it can safely be disposed of in a well that's 4,200 feet deep.

    Three samples that were displayed by Jackson County NAACP President Ronstance Pittman at a public meeting on Waste Management's deep well injection proposal. The sample on the left is full of leachate from the Jackson County landfill, the stuff that would be injected into the well. The sample on the right shows leachate after it's been treated at a wastewater treatment plant. The one in the middle is tap water.
  5. Rick Scott eyes Patronis as CFO, but it may not help him in Panhandle

    State Roundup

    TALLAHASSEE — Gov. Rick Scott's expected pick of Jimmy Patronis as the state's next chief financial officer would be a solid addition to the Republican Party ticket but may not do much to smooth some rough waters developing in the Panhandle over schools, area Republicans said this week.

    Former state Rep. Jimmy Patronis, left, is being considered by Gov. Rick Scott for the state’s chief financial officer. Patronis, seen with Scott in 2011, is considered one of the governor’s chief loyalists. (Associated Press)

  1. Half of Florida lawmakers fail or nearly fail review of support for public records

    State Roundup

    WEST PALM BEACH — Half of Florida's legislators failed or nearly failed in a review of their support for public records and meetings given by Florida newspapers and an open-government group after this year's legislative sessions.

    State Senator Bill Galvano, R- Bradenton (left) and Florida House Speaker Richard Corcoran ranked on opposite sides of the spectrum in an analysis of support for open records. Galvano scored a B-minus and Corcoran scored a D-plus.
[Times file photo]
  2. Legalized medical marijuana signed into law by Rick Scott

    State Roundup

    TALLAHASSEE — Gov. Rick Scott on Friday signed into law a broader medical marijuana system for the state, following through on a promise he made earlier this month.

    Gov. Rick Scott signed legislation on Friday that legalizes medical marijuana in Florida.
  3. Rick Scott eyes Patronis as CFO, but it may not help him in Panhandle

    State Roundup

    TALLAHASSEE — Gov. Rick Scott's expected pick of Jimmy Patronis as the state's next chief financial officer would be a solid addition to the Republican Party ticket but may not do much to smooth some rough waters developing in the Panhandle over schools, area Republicans said this week.

    Former state Rep. Jimmy Patronis, left, is being considered by Gov. Rick Scott for the state’s chief financial officer. Patronis, seen with Scott in 2011, is considered one of the governor’s chief loyalists. (Associated Press)

  4. Legislature's most interesting man is also its most contradictory

    State Roundup

    TALLAHASSEE — If he were being cast for a television commercial, House Speaker Richard Corcoran would likely win the part this year as "the most interesting man in Tallahassee."

    Florida House Speaker Richard Corcoran, R-Land O'Lakes. [Scott Keeler | Tampa Bay Times]
  5. When Legislature faltered, Rick Scott took advantage

    State Roundup

    TALLAHASSEE — The midnight phone call to Senate President Joe Negron from Florida Gov. Rick Scott on June 1st was not unexpected.

    Florida House Speaker Richard Corcoran, R-Land O'Lakes, addresses legislators and media at the end of the special session on Friday as Senate President Joe Negron, R-Stuart, left, and Gov. Rick Scott look on. [AP | Steve Cannon]
  1. Legislature's most interesting man is also its most contradictory

    State Roundup

    TALLAHASSEE — If he were being cast for a television commercial, House Speaker Richard Corcoran would likely win the part this year as "the most interesting man in Tallahassee."

    Florida House Speaker Richard Corcoran, R-Land O'Lakes. [Scott Keeler | Tampa Bay Times]
  2. When Legislature faltered, Rick Scott took advantage

    State Roundup

    TALLAHASSEE — The midnight phone call to Senate President Joe Negron from Florida Gov. Rick Scott on June 1st was not unexpected.

    Florida House Speaker Richard Corcoran, R-Land O'Lakes, addresses legislators and media at the end of the special session on Friday as Senate President Joe Negron, R-Stuart, left, and Gov. Rick Scott look on. [AP | Steve Cannon]
  3. 'Hollow victory?' Some lawmakers say new K-12 spending isn't enough

    State Roundup

    TALLAHASSEE — Some Democratic lawmakers on Friday criticized a new K-12 schools budget the Legislature approved for 2017-18 that would boost spending by $100 per student over this school year — calling the additional dollars a "hollow victory" and "not enough" to truly address public education.

    Sen. Bill Montford, D-Tallahassee, debates the education portion of the budget bill during session on Friday. [AP Photo | Steve Cannon]
  1. Half of Florida lawmakers fail or nearly fail review of support for public records

    State Roundup

    WEST PALM BEACH — Half of Florida's legislators failed or nearly failed in a review of their support for public records and meetings given by Florida newspapers and an open-government group after this year's legislative sessions.

    State Senator Bill Galvano, R- Bradenton (left) and Florida House Speaker Richard Corcoran ranked on opposite sides of the spectrum in an analysis of support for open records. Galvano scored a B-minus and Corcoran scored a D-plus.
[Times file photo]
  2. When Legislature faltered, Rick Scott took advantage

    State Roundup

    TALLAHASSEE — The midnight phone call to Senate President Joe Negron from Florida Gov. Rick Scott on June 1st was not unexpected.

    Florida House Speaker Richard Corcoran, R-Land O'Lakes, addresses legislators and media at the end of the special session on Friday as Senate President Joe Negron, R-Stuart, left, and Gov. Rick Scott look on. [AP | Steve Cannon]
  3. 'Hollow victory?' Some lawmakers say new K-12 spending isn't enough

    State Roundup

    TALLAHASSEE — Some Democratic lawmakers on Friday criticized a new K-12 schools budget the Legislature approved for 2017-18 that would boost spending by $100 per student over this school year — calling the additional dollars a "hollow victory" and "not enough" to truly address public education.

    Sen. Bill Montford, D-Tallahassee, debates the education portion of the budget bill during session on Friday. [AP Photo | Steve Cannon]
  1. 'Garbage juice' seen as threat to drinking water in Florida Panhandle county

    Water

    To Waste Management, the nation's largest handler of garbage, the liquid that winds up at the bottom of a landfill is called "leachate," and it can safely be disposed of in a well that's 4,200 feet deep.

    Three samples that were displayed by Jackson County NAACP President Ronstance Pittman at a public meeting on Waste Management's deep well injection proposal. The sample on the left is full of leachate from the Jackson County landfill, the stuff that would be injected into the well. The sample on the right shows leachate after it's been treated at a wastewater treatment plant. The one in the middle is tap water.
  2. When Legislature faltered, Rick Scott took advantage

    State Roundup

    TALLAHASSEE — The midnight phone call to Senate President Joe Negron from Florida Gov. Rick Scott on June 1st was not unexpected.

    Florida House Speaker Richard Corcoran, R-Land O'Lakes, addresses legislators and media at the end of the special session on Friday as Senate President Joe Negron, R-Stuart, left, and Gov. Rick Scott look on. [AP | Steve Cannon]
  3. 'Hollow victory?' Some lawmakers say new K-12 spending isn't enough

    State Roundup

    TALLAHASSEE — Some Democratic lawmakers on Friday criticized a new K-12 schools budget the Legislature approved for 2017-18 that would boost spending by $100 per student over this school year — calling the additional dollars a "hollow victory" and "not enough" to truly address public education.

    Sen. Bill Montford, D-Tallahassee, debates the education portion of the budget bill during session on Friday. [AP Photo | Steve Cannon]
  1. Half of Florida lawmakers fail or nearly fail review of support for public records

    State Roundup

    WEST PALM BEACH — Half of Florida's legislators failed or nearly failed in a review of their support for public records and meetings given by Florida newspapers and an open-government group after this year's legislative sessions.

    State Senator Bill Galvano, R- Bradenton (left) and Florida House Speaker Richard Corcoran ranked on opposite sides of the spectrum in an analysis of support for open records. Galvano scored a B-minus and Corcoran scored a D-plus.
[Times file photo]
  2. When Legislature faltered, Rick Scott took advantage

    State Roundup

    TALLAHASSEE — The midnight phone call to Senate President Joe Negron from Florida Gov. Rick Scott on June 1st was not unexpected.

    Florida House Speaker Richard Corcoran, R-Land O'Lakes, addresses legislators and media at the end of the special session on Friday as Senate President Joe Negron, R-Stuart, left, and Gov. Rick Scott look on. [AP | Steve Cannon]
  3. 'Hollow victory?' Some lawmakers say new K-12 spending isn't enough

    State Roundup

    TALLAHASSEE — Some Democratic lawmakers on Friday criticized a new K-12 schools budget the Legislature approved for 2017-18 that would boost spending by $100 per student over this school year — calling the additional dollars a "hollow victory" and "not enough" to truly address public education.

    Sen. Bill Montford, D-Tallahassee, debates the education portion of the budget bill during session on Friday. [AP Photo | Steve Cannon]