Saturday, November 18, 2017
Politics

William March: Ken Hagan raises unprecedented six-figures for three months running

RECOMMENDED READING


Summer fundraising lull? What summer fundraising lull?

Republican County Commissioner Ken Hagan has begun his re-election campaign with a fundraising feat that appears unprecedented — $100,000 in each of the first three months of his campaign.

Hagan reported raising $100,759 during June, following reports of $101,200 in May and $100,510 in April, when he filed. After a few refunds, his total is $300,460.

Since 2000, when campaign finance reports became accessible online, only four other candidates have raised $300,000 or more in their entire campaigns — Rose Ferlita in 2006, Al Higginbotham in 2014, Sandy Murman in 2016, and Kevin Beckner in 2012. None of them beat $100,000 in a single month.

Hagan raised $358,241 in 2010 and $304,805 in 2014.

He has said his preferred strategy is to raise money early in the race so he can devote the election year to campaigning. But the tactic also helps scare off potential competitors.

So far, Hagan has one GOP primary opponent, first-timer Chris Paradies, and no Democratic challenger.

As in previous months, Hagan's report shows heavy contributions from real estate development interests, and a number of contributions from corporations with a single owner. That effectively enables one individual to legally give several times the maximum allowed.

In June, for example, he received nine contributions of the maximum $1,000 each from corporations associated with Jeffery Hills of Eisenhower Property Group, five $1,000 contributions from corporations tied to developer Steven Samaha, and three $1,000 contributions from companies linked to investor Jonathan Politano of Aventura.

Term-limited in his current countywide seat, Hagan is running for the District 2 seat representing north central and northeastern Hillsborough County.

Slow start in Hillsborough commission District 1

What's likely to be a tough battle for the District 1 county commissioner's seat, meanwhile, is starting slowly.

Democratic Tampa City Council member Yolie Capin, the first to enter the race when she filed in late May, so far hasn't raised a dime.

Republican Aakash Patel reported raising $51,187 in his first month as a candidate, including a $20,000 loan from himself. He says he has 17 fundraising and meet-and-greet events planned before the end of the year, including a kick-off July 25.

Both candidates have actually filed to run in 2020. Technically, the District 1 seat isn't on the 2018 ballot right now.

But it's expected to be placed on the 2018 ballot as a special election when current District 1 Commissioner Sandy Murman resigns halfway through her term, as she has announced she will do, to run for a countywide seat. Capin and Patel will then switch to 2018.

Capin doesn't plan to raise any money until a kickoff Nov. 8 at a new Gonzmart restaurant planned for Ybor City. Until then she's just recruiting backers.

"Right now, I just want the support," she said. "At my kickoff, that's when I want the money."

Sean Shaw quells rumors he seeks Attorney General post

The rumors were partly true: First-term state Rep. Sean Shaw, lawyer, Princeton grad and son of Leander Shaw, the state's first black Supreme Court chief justice, actually was exploring entering the race for attorney general.

There's no announced Democratic big name in the race right now, although Democrats are talking about Fort Lauderdale Mayor Jack Seiler, Miami-Dade State Attorney Katherine Rundle and megalawyer and donor Mitch Berger.

Democrat and first-time candidate Ryan Torrens, a Tampa lawyer specializing in consumer financial protection, has filed.

But Shaw's out.

"I'm happy where I am and I intend to run for re-election," he said.

He did test the waters, and acknowledged he didn't get encouragement from the Florida Justice Academy, the state's trial lawyers' association, whose support any Democrat seeking the office would need.

Contact William March at wemarch@gmail.com

Comments
Senate ethics, relatively silent, could face busy year

Senate ethics, relatively silent, could face busy year

WASHINGTON — It’s been nearly six years since the Senate Ethics Committee conducted a major investigation of a sitting senator. Next year, the panel could be working nonstop, deciding the fate of up to three lawmakers, including two facing allegation...
Updated: 2 hours ago
In struggling upstate New York cities, refugees vital to rebirth

In struggling upstate New York cities, refugees vital to rebirth

UTICA, N.Y.Pat Marino pulled into the shop on a cold, wet Thursday and stood close as a young mechanic with gelled-up hair and earrings lifted the truck and ducked underneath."You need a little bit more oil," the mechanic said."Five quarts wasn’t eno...
Updated: 4 hours ago
As sex scandals topple the powerful: Why not Trump?

As sex scandals topple the powerful: Why not Trump?

WASHINGTON — "You can do anything," Donald Trump once boasted, speaking of groping and kissing unsuspecting women. Maybe he could, but not everyone can. The man who openly bragged about grabbing women’s private parts — but denied he really did so — w...
Published: 11/17/17
Allegations against Alabama’s Roy Moore dividing GOP women

Allegations against Alabama’s Roy Moore dividing GOP women

MONTGOMERY, Ala. — Standing on the white marble steps of Alabama’s Capitol, Kayla Moore surrounded herself with two dozen other women Friday to defend husband Roy Moore against accusations of sexual misconduct that are dividing Republicans, and women...
Published: 11/17/17
Franken apologizes to woman who says he kissed, groped her

Franken apologizes to woman who says he kissed, groped her

WASHINGTON — Minnesota Sen. Al Franken personally apologized to the woman who has accused him of forcibly kissing her and groping her during a 2006 USO tour, saying he remembers their encounter differently but is "ashamed that my actions ruined that ...
Published: 11/17/17
Negative mailers trace back to campaign of state House candidate who denies them

Negative mailers trace back to campaign of state House candidate who denies them

An 87-year-old widow from Melbourne, a mysterious direct mail company in tiny Buffalo, Wyo., and a tangled web of political committees all were linked to the onslaught of negative mailers that helped Lawrence McClure win the Republican primary in Pla...
Published: 11/17/17

10,000 more FBI records unsealed from JFK assassination files

DALLAS — Yet again, the National Archives released a trove of records from the Kennedy assassination files on a Friday afternoon, another strange stream of loose ends, dead ends and tangents with little apparent connection to the assassination of the...
Published: 11/17/17
William March: Why Jose Vazquez had to campaign from a prison cell

William March: Why Jose Vazquez had to campaign from a prison cell

Jose Vazquez, Democratic nominee in the Dec. 19 state House District 58 special election, doesn’t seem like a criminal. He’s 43, divorced with six children, and has worked as a security guard and in auto recycling. He was a high-level political field...
Published: 11/17/17
Selective outrage: Trump criticizes Franken, silent on Moore

Selective outrage: Trump criticizes Franken, silent on Moore

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump is displaying selective outrage over allegations of sexual harassment against prominent men in politics, as his own tortured past lingers over his response. Trump moved quickly Thursday to condemn accusations again...
Published: 11/17/17
Franken draws swift condemnation in Congress after woman claims he groped her

Franken draws swift condemnation in Congress after woman claims he groped her

WASHINGTON — Sen. Al Franken, D-Minn., faced swift condemnation and bipartisan calls for an ethics investigation Thursday after he was accused of forcibly kissing and groping a broadcaster and model while traveling overseas in 2006.The allegations ag...
Published: 11/16/17